TideLog Archive for December, 2011

I needed to do this recently because I had to clone a friend’s hard disk, both drives were SATA and my power supply only has one native SATA power connector. My optical drives are both SATA too, running off a Molex to 2xSATA adapter, but connecting 2 hard drives to one 12v plug causes power problems for the drives as they are high current, whereas optical drives aren’t.

So I’ve disconnected my optical drives to use just one of the 2 piggybacked SATA power leads. This left me with no drive to run Hiren’s disc from, so I decided to make a USB boot drive instead. here’s how I did it! This is also very useful if you’re on a laptop or desktop with a failed drive, simply use an ISO image instead of physical disc.

You will neeed:

  • A copy of Hiren’s Boot CD 10.3 or newer in either disc or ISO format, you can extract the ISO or mount it using a virtual CD program such as MagicDisc (freeware, yay!)
  • A USB pen drive of AT LEAST 1GB (gigabyte)
  • A copy of USB Disk Storage Format, which I’ve hosted on TideLog, HERE.
  • A copy of  GRUB 4 DOS installer 1.1, also hosted on TideLog, HERE.
  • A computer with CD drive (for copying the disc files if you have a Hiren CD)
  • Your computer MUST be able to boot from USB if it is the one you are working with in recovery. Most computers about 3 or 4 years old will be fine.

How to perform:

1. Download, extract and run USB Disk Storage Format tool. Follow my steps in my screengrab below, in numbered order:

The reason we’re using this is it needs to be FAT. A lot of people have tried using exFAT in Vista and Win 7 but it won’t work and sometimes Win XP gets it wrong. I prefer third party apps to format external drives.

2. Run GRUB4DOS Installer, and follow the numbered steps as below. MAKE SURE you select the correct drive:

3. Insert your BootCD (10.3 or newer) in your CD Drive and copy everything from the CD to your USB Drive. If you have an ISO image, you can either extract all files from it, or mount it using a virtual CD program like MagicDisc mentioned in the requirements, then copying and pasting from the virtual CD as you would a physical disc.

4. Copy grldr and menu.lst from grub4dos.zip (or from HBCD folder) to the USB drive:

5. Finished! Restart the computer it is to be used on, and make sure the BIOS is set to boot from USB. Most BIOSes allow you to bring up a boot menu, by pressing F12 or similar, it will then autodetect bootable devices, select your USB drive and off it goes!

Configuring different BIOSes

To enter the BIOS press the “Del” key on your keyboard. Alternatives are “F1”, “F2”, “Insert”, and “F10”. Some PC BIOSes might even require a different key to be pressed. Commonly a PC will show a message like “Press [Del] to enter Setup” to indicate that you need to press the “Del” key. Some AMI BIOS require you to enable the option “USB Keyboard Legacy support”.

For AMI BIOS:

  • Go to “Feature Setup”. “Enable” these options: “USB Function Support”, “USB Function For DOS” and “ThumbDrive for DOS”. Go to “Advanced Setup”. Set the “1st Boot Device” to “USB RMD-FDD”.
    Reboot the PC and it now should boot from your USB drive.
  • Go to “USB Mass Storage Device Configuration”. Select “Emulation Type”, and set it to “Harddisk”. Go to the “Boot Menu” and set the “1st boot device” to “USB-Stick“. Exit the BIOS, saving the changes. You can try setting “Emulation Type” to “Floppy” or “Forced FDD”.

For PHOENIX/AWARD BIOS:

  • Go to “Advanced BIOS Features”. Go to the “1st Boot device” and set it to “USB-ZIP”.

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The following functions are handled by the chassis control unit (CIM) on Volvo’s B7R coach, B7RLE low entry city bus, and B9TL double decker bus. Any faults usually result in a CHECK lamp illumination or a warning icon illumination, accompanied with a “Check diagnostics for Chassis Control Unit at next stop” message in the driver infodisplay.

Brake lights

The control unit controls the body’s brake lamp with the help of a retarder signal and a brake lamp signal from the bus Vehicle Electronic Control Unit (VECU).

Idle

The chassis control unit’s idling function signals to the body when the accelerator pedal is in idling position.

Kneeling

The kneeling function works together with the electronically controlled suspension (ECS) and activates a lamp on the instrument panel when the bus kneels. The function also activates a CHECK warning when the ECS indicates that pressure is too low.

Buzzer

The buzzer function controls the external buzzer in the dashboard which is connected to the chassis control unit (CIM). The buzzer is activated on request from the body and from the internal CIM functions. The buzzer sounds when CHECK messages or other info is displayed in the instrument panel.

Check of battery voltage level

The function senses when the bus’s batteries (2x12v batteries, each with an alternator) voltage is less than 22 Volts and then shuts down all voltage users that have low priority. When battery voltage hits less than 16 Volts an internal signal is generated for low battery level, and with voltages exceeding 36 Volts an internal signal is generated for high battery level. These internal signals are used for opening and closing certain inputs and outputs. The signal for low battery level also closes the normal signal transmission on the J1587/J1708 link. Low battery voltage will result in erratic engine starting and other electrical failures.

Retarder control

In normal operation the retarder (engine brake, known as JAK, JaKob’s engine brake) will only accept a number of preset braking torques. In those cases when the vehicle control unit (VECU) wants the retarder to brake with a torque which is not preset, this limiting function must be disconnected. This is achieved by activating an earth signal on the retarder control unit’s inputs.

Brake pressure

The brake pressure function reads off the air pressure on the front and rear brake tanks respectively, and controls the corresponding gauge on the instrument panel via data link J1587/J1708. The function also activates an alarm on the instrument panel when insufficient pressure is shown.

Vehicle speed

The function gives three output signals when the vehicle’s speed exceeds 5 km/h, 20 km/h and 95 km/h. The function also controls a frequency-modified signal with constant pulse width which represents the vehicle’s speed. (This signal is known as the C3 signal.)

Starter motor

The chassis control unit checks that the requirements for starting are fulfilled and then activates the starter motor’s relay.

Dimmer

This function reproduces the rheostat level which is given from the instrument panel to be used in the body instrument’s lamps.

Parking brake

The parking brake function gives a signal indicating the parking brake’s status to the body system when the parking brake is engaged. The body system uses the status signal to activate an alarm if the door to the driver’s cab is open when the parking brake is disengaged. The chassis control unit (CIM) also activates the parking brake lamp on the driver’s instrument panel.

Fire alarm

If a fire is discovered in the engine bay or in the bus body, a fire alarm is activated on the instrument panel. The fire alarm also activates the instrument cluster buzzer.

Main switch

The vehicle’s main electrical circuit cannot be permitted to close down in an uncontrolled way, i.e immediately. After the ignition is switched off certain functions must be provided with power for a certain period of time. The gearbox takes ten seconds to close down, which is the longest closing-down time. For this reason, the chassis control unit’s holding circuit function releases the holding circuit ten seconds after the ignition has been switched off and leaves the switching off of the main circuit to the main circuit’s switch.

Steering wheel adjustment

This function checks that the parking brake is applied and that the ignition is on before it permits adjustment of the steering wheel and instrument panel.

Fuel level

The fuel level function receives signals from the fuel level sensors and controls the fuel level gauges on the driver’s instrument panel. The function also sends a warning to the instrument panel when insufficient fuel level is recorded.
The calculation of the fuel level is determined by how the jumpers are set, (so that the function can be adapted to different fuel tanks). In those cases in which there are two fuel tanks, the jumpers decide the relationship between the sizes of the tanks. If there is only one tank, the jumpers give the setting the shape of the tank. (The jumpers can only be set to 15 V, earth or not be connected at all).

Fuel cut-off

This function controls the fuel cut-off’s solenoid valve and retains its position until the valve needs closing. A pulse for closing the valve is sent when the emergency switch is activated or when the main switch is switched off. The valve is opened when the emergency switch is switched off and the main switch is active or if the main switch is activated while the emergency switch is switched off. If both are activated at the same time, the emergency circuit breaker overrides.

Bogie

The bogie function checks the air pressure in the bogie axle’s air suspension bellows and activates a lamp on the driver’s instrument panel when the air pressure is released. This funtion only applies to tri-axle B7R coaches with a double rear axle (bogie). Most B7RLE and B9TL doble deckers have one front and one rear axle. The inner-most axle of a bogie can be raised or lowered using the air suspension.

Alternator

The chassis control unit (CIM) senses the status of the alternators, illuminating icons on the instrument panel if any of the alternators are not charging. This warning is shown before the engine is started in order to ensure that the function works. If the alternator lights do not go out once the engine is running, check the alternator(s) drivebelt, or the regulators on the alternators for any faults. If the battery voltage in the infodisplay is less than 22v but the batteries are fine, there is a fault in one or more alternator regulators.

Engine start/stop

The chassis control unit (CIM) handles the start signal to the vehicle control unit (VECU) and checks that established requirements for starting are fulfilled.

Temperature

The temperature function reads from an inside sensor and an outside sensor and sends the signals to the instrument panel where the temperatures are shown on the infodisplay.

Gearbox

In those cases where the vehicle is equipped with MGS or EGS, the gear position function signals to the instrument panel if the gearbox is in high gear. The function also informs the instrument panel if the EGS gives a warning signal.

Open door

The open door function senses whether a door is open and, if so, lights up a symbol on the instrument panel, sounding the instrument cluster buzzer all the time the door is open. Once the open door is closed, the buzzer turns off. The open-door function is used with a conventional electrical system in the body. It monitors doors such as the emergency exits, cab door (not all bodies support this) and the bonnet. On some vehicles the passenger entry door is linked to this so the bus cannot be moved if it is open or has a faulty potentiometer.

On the B7RLE and B9TL, a faulty potentiometer or potentiometer track switch on the passenger door usually results in the STOPPING sign not extinguishing once the doors open. It should go out when the doors open, not when they close.

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May all your wishes come true! 2011 has been a good year, nothing has really been drastic for any of us. Christmas this year is going to be quite hectic, as Kassie still has her Mum, Dad, 7 sisters and 3 brothers staying with us this year, as well as Mika, and our two cats Eponine and Fluffy, with big Retriever Nala. The two maids aren’t with us, they’ve gone back to Japan for Christmas, they’ll be back after New Year.

Stay safe, have fun, but don’t drink too much, otherwise you’ll get in trouble. Just so you know, here’s our 3rd Supergirl, in her uniform by the Christmas tree, she’s ready to fly out if you need her 😉

Don’t forget to come back after New Year and tell us all about what you’ve been up to with family, I love hearing about people’s fun times!

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As I mentioned in THIS PREVIOUS POST, the electronic accelerator pedal position sensor on Volvo’s B7R coach, B7RLE low entry city bus version and their B9TL double decker can go faulty. This will result in the Engine ECU reducing the engine speed to safe mode, or limp home mode. The sensor is actually a big potentiometer that is adjusted. The more you press the pedal, the resistance increases, so the engine ECU knows how much to increase engine speed, and as you’ll know from those radios and other goods that use pots for volume controls, they go bad after so long, and start to become intermittent.

The pedal potentiometer is connected to the Vehicle ECU (VECU). The VECU converts the resistance value from the potentiometer into a percentage value, and sends it to the Engine ECU, which in turn adjusts the engine speed by increasing air and fuel intake amongst other things, while sending data to the Transmission ECU (TECU) about the engine speed so it can adjust gears, or operate the retarder (engine brake) etc. As I mentioned in the other post, the accelerator pedal potentiometer is connected to the VECU via two hard-drawn signals, one digital (IVS) and one analogue. The analogue signal is generated by the pedal’s potentiometer and the digital by an engine idling switch. If a fault occurs in the potentiometer, the digital signal takes over only allowing the bus to reach a certain speed, so that the vehicle can be moved (known as Limp-home). The digital (IVS) signal enters via a port in the VECU, which in turn is connected to the body contact block (BB1:1).

Here I’ll show you how to replace the potentiometer, as I did it a few days ago on my favourite B7RLE of Rikku’s fleet! The CHECK light came on with the “Check diagnostics for Engine ECU at next stop” message, it wasn’t accelerating smoothly. The turbo gauge wasn’t moving either, it all felt like the engine was in a deep sleep and didn’t want to move the bus!

As I discussed in my last article about the sensor, both pedal sensor and turbo failure can generate the same symptoms, causing limp home mode (Rikku calls it sleepy snail mode!) with the CHECK light and “Check Diagnostics for Engine ECU” message in the info panel. Thereby make sure you fully investigate all possible causes by reading ECU fault codes using VCADS Pro, and checking wiring.

Once you have verified the fault, and determined the pedal sensor is definitely at fault, it’s time to replace the sensor.

1. Remove the drivers seat. This isn’t ultimately necessary, but I found it made more workroom than just adjusting the seat as far back as its rails would allow. The removal of the seat depends on the seat itself, as different B7R’s and B7RLE’s have different seats, depending on the body and option configuration. If you’re not sure how to remove it, just make it go back as far as possible.

2. Make sure the engine is switched fully off, and that the ignition switch is in position 0. Disconnect the bus electrical system.

3. Locate the pedals (duh!), don’t forget that the right pedal is the accelerator pedal, the one we need! Remove the floor mat, or move it aside:

4. Remove the 3 bolts holding the pedal assembly to the bus floor, placing them safely aside, below is the location of the fixing bolts:

5. Move the accelerator pedal to the side and remove the cable clamp (1). Remove the connector (2). Remove the accelerator pedal sensor potentiometer screws (3) as numbered and shown below. Remove the sensor.

You shouldn’t need to remove the second cable mounting clamp with screw seen in the image, unless the sensor supply cable needs to be replaced. This runs under the bus chassis up to the Vehicle ECU, and is joined in various places depending on the bus, wiring and body, as the signals go from the VECU to the EECU and TECU.

6. Fit the new sensor, and mount it, making sure it fits back exactly in the same position as the old one, with the wiring connector facing downwards. Refit the pedal with the 3 bolts, and perform a hand test. Press the pedal with your hand and make sure it is smooth. Refit the floor carpet, and driver’s seat, if you completely removed it for workspace. If not simply slide it back into driving position and make sure the seat adjustment rails lock in place when the adjustment lever is released.

7. Switch the bus electrical system back on, start the engine, and perform a rev test with the gearbox in Park or Neutral (the B7R coach is manual, the B7RLE city bus version is often auto), pressing and releasing the pedal. Watch your revs and listen to the engine. If the CHECK light illuminates and/or any Check Diagnostics messages appear in the infodisplay, perform testing on other areas. There could be signal loss between control units and wiring.

8. Perform the VCADS-test: 27102–3 Accelerator pedal, test with your diagnostic PC connected to the electrical system of the bus.

9. If the standstill rev test and VCADS tests were successful, take the bus for a test drive, varying your pressure on the pedal. When I’m on a test track I like to thrust the pedal up and down to make sure the system and engine reacts, being gentle then rough, but DO NOT do this on public roads!

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